As far as beauty living is concern, knowing What is exfoliation; Types of exfoliation is very important.

Many wants to know the meaning of exfoliation, but few has gotten the really solution for their problems. Today you have been so lucky to be amongst the discoverer, Happy adventuring!

What is Exfoliation?

Exfoliation is the process of removing dead skin cells from the outer layer of your skin. While some people believe that this improves the appearance of their skin, it’s not for everyone and – if not done properly – could do more harm than good.

If you choose to exfoliate, it’s important to do so safely so that it does not damage your skin or lead to increased redness or acne breakouts.

Since every type of exfoliation may not work for every skin type, it’s important to consider your skin type before choosing an exfoliation method:

  • Sensitive skin may sting or burn after product use
  • Normal skin is clear and not sensitive
  • Dry skin is flaky, itchy or rough
  • Oily skin is shiny and greasy
  • Combination skin is dry in some areas and oily in others

Types of Exfoliation

Exfoliation
Exfoliating

Mechanical

This process involves physically scrubbing the skin with an abrasive. Mechanical exfoliants include microfiber cloths, adhesive exfoliation sheets, micro-bead facial scrubs, crepe paper, crushed apricot kernel or almond shells, sugar or salt crystals, pumice, and abrasive materials such as sponges, loofahs, brushes, and simply fingernails.

Facial scrubs are available in over-the-counter products for application by the user. People with dry skin should avoid exfoliants which include a significant portion of pumice, or crushed volcanic rock. Pumice is considered a good material to exfoliate the skin of the feet. Microdermabrasion is another mechanical method of exfoliation.

Chemical

Chemical exfoliants include scrubs containing salicylic acid, glycolic acid, fruit enzymes, citric acid, or malic acid which may be applied in high concentrations by a medical professional, or in lower concentrations in over-the-counter products.

Chemical exfoliation may involve the use of products that contain alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs), beta hydroxy acids (BHAs), or enzymes that act to loosen the glue-like substance that holds the cells together, allowing them to ease away. This type of exfoliation is recommended for people treating acne.

In beauty spa treatment in continental Europe, the chemical properties of wine-producing grapes are exploited in the practice of vinotherapy which is becoming increasingly popular.

With hair removal

Some methods of hair removal also exfoliate the skin.

Waxing is a mechanical process performed with the intention of plucking the hair, but it also functions as a mechanical exfoliant. It can be done every two to eight weeks. It is not carried out as frequently as many exfoliate.

So, it does not fully substitute for an exfoliation regimen, but may substitute for a normal session in a regimen.

Nair is an example of a chemical hair removal product which also functions as a chemical exfoliant. It is applied more frequently than waxing (once a week rather than once a month) since it only partially destroys hair below the skin, rather than destroying the entire root as with waxing.

Using it weekly can substitute for a weekly exfoliant regime. It is a very aggressive chemical and cannot be used on the face, so other exfoliants would need to be used on the face.

Wetshaving also has exfoliating properties:

first, the action of moving a shaving brush vigorously across the face washes the face and removes dead skin at the same time. After applying the lather with a brush, the use of a double-edged safety razor or straight razor removes dead skin simply because the razor is dragged much more closely across the skin, and removes dead skin more effectively than a cartridge or electric razor.

Dermaplaning

Dermaplaning is a medical procedure that exfoliates the skin (or epidermis) by removing dead skin and vellus hair (peach fuzz). The procedure is performed by an aesthetician, who will gently glide a scalpel across the skin, removing the outermost layer of skin cells and hair from the face. As a byproduct, it also shaves off the vellus hair, but the hair will grow back at the same rate and texture as before, because it does not change the DNA of the hair bulb.

The procedure involves the use of a 25-centimetre (10 in) scalpel which curves into a sharp point. In most cases, the blade is used on clean dry skin on the forehead, cheeks, chin, nose and neck.

Dermaplaning can also be performed on skin that has had oil applied to it.

CAUTION! As carefully advise, Before any Usage of these methods, Users must be aware of its disadvantage.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here