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GREEN COFFEE: Uses, Effectiveness and Side Effect

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Green coffee beans

Green coffee beans are coffee seeds (beans) of Coffea fruits that have not yet been roasted. The roasting process of coffee beans reduces amounts of the chemical chlorogenic acid. Therefore, green coffee beans have a higher level of chlorogenic acid compared to regular, roasted coffee beans. Chlorogenic acid in green coffee is thought to have health benefits.

Green coffee became popular for weight loss after it was mentioned on the Dr. Oz show in 2012. The Dr. Oz show referred to it as “The green coffee bean that burns fat fast” and claims that no exercise or diet is needed.

People take green coffee by mouth for obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, Alzheimer’s disease, and bacterial infections.

How does it work?

Green coffee beans are coffee beans that have not yet been roasted. These coffee beans contain a higher amount of chemical chlorogenic acid.

This chemical is thought to have health benefits. For high blood pressure, it might affect blood vessels so that blood pressure is reduced.

For weight loss, chlorogenic acid in green coffee is thought to affect how the body handles blood sugar and metabolism.

Uses & Effectiveness

Insufficient Evidence for…

High blood pressure – Early research suggests that taking green coffee extracts containing 50 mg to 140 mg of chlorogenic acids daily for 4 weeks to 12 weeks can reduce blood pressure in Japanese adults with mild and untreated high blood pressure.

Systolic blood pressure (the top number) appears to be reduced by 5 mmHg to 10 mmHg. Diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) appears to be reduced by 3 mmHg to 7 mmHg.

Obesity – Early research shows that adults with obesity who take a specific green coffee extract (Svetol, Naturex) five times daily for 8 weeks to 12 weeks, either alone or together with the regular coffee product Coffee Slender (Med-Eq Ltd., Tonsberg, Norway), lose an average of 2.5 to 3.7 kg more weight than people taking a placebo or regular coffee by itself.

  • Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Type 2 diabetes.
  • etc
Green coffee beans
Green coffee beans Product

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Side Effects & Safety

Green coffee is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth appropriately. Green coffee extracts taken in doses up to 480 mg daily have been used safely for up to 12 weeks. Also, a specific green coffee extract (Svetol, Naturex, South Hackensack, NJ) has been used safely in doses up to 200 mg five times daily for up to 12 weeks.

It is important to understand that green coffee contains caffeine, similar to regular coffee. Therefore, green coffee can cause caffeine-related side effects similar to coffee.

Caffeine can cause insomnia, nervousness, and restlessness, stomach upset, nausea and vomiting, increased heart and breathing rate, and other side effects. Consuming large amounts of coffee might also cause headache, anxiety, agitation, ringing in the ears, and irregular heartbeats.

Special Precautions & Warnings!

Pregnancy and breastfeeding – There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking green coffee if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid the use.

Abnormally high levels of homocysteine – Consuming a high dose of chlorogenic acid for a short duration has caused increased plasma homocysteine levels, which may be associated with conditions such as heart disease.

Anxiety disorders – The caffeine in green coffee might make anxiety worse.

Bleeding disorders – There is some concern that the caffeine in green coffee might make bleeding disorders worse.

Diabetes – Some research suggests that caffeine contained in green coffee might change the way people with diabetes process sugar. Caffeine has been reported to cause increases as well as decreases in blood sugar. Use caffeine with caution if you have diabetes and monitor your blood sugar carefully.

Diarrhea – Green coffee contains caffeine. The caffeine in coffee, especially when taken in large amounts, can worsen diarrhea.

Glaucoma – Taking caffeine which is contained in green coffee can increases the pressure inside the eye. The increase starts within 30 minutes and lasts for at least 90 minutes.

High blood pressure – Taking caffeine found in green coffee might increase blood pressure in people with high blood pressure. However, this effect might be less in people who consume caffeine from coffee or other sources regularly.

High cholesterol – Certain components of unfiltered coffee have been shown to increase cholesterol levels. These components can be found in green coffee as well. However, it is unclear if green coffee can also cause increased cholesterol levels.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) – Green coffee contains caffeine. The caffeine in coffee, especially when taken in large amounts, can worsen diarrhea and might worsen symptoms of IBS.

Thinning bones (osteoporosis): Caffeine from green coffee and other sources can increase the amount of calcium that is flushed out in the urine. This might weaken bones.

If you have osteoporosis, limit caffeine consumption to less than 300 mg per day (approximately 2-3 cups of regular coffee). Taking calcium supplements may help to make up for calcium that is lost. Postmenopausal women who have an inherited condition that keeps them from processing vitamin D normally should be especially cautious when using caffeine.

Dosing

The appropriate dose of green coffee depends on several factors such as the user’s age, health, and several other conditions.

At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for green coffee (in children/in adults).

Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important.

Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

Have you ever purchased GREEN COFFEE? Please let us know by dropping observations on the Comment Session below.

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VITAMINE E: Uses, Benefits and Side Effect

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Vitamin E
  • Generic Name: vitamin E (VYE ta min E)
  • Brand Names: Aqua-E, Aquasol E, Aquavit-E, Aqueous Vitamin E, E-400 Clear

What is vitamin E?

Vitamin E is an antioxidant that occurs naturally in foods such as nuts, seeds, and leafy green vegetables. Vitamin E is a fat-soluble vitamin important for many processes in the body.

Vitamin E is used to treat or prevent vitamin E deficiency. People with certain diseases may need extra vitamin E.

Important learning

Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all the medicines you use.

Before taking this medicine

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to use vitamin E if you have other medical conditions, especially:

  • anemia (low red blood cells);
  • a bleeding or blood clotting disorder such as hemophilia;
  • liver disease;
  • kidney disease;
  • any allergies;
  • an eye disorder called retinitis pigmentosa;
  • a vitamin K deficiency;
  • high cholesterol or triglycerides (a type of fat in the blood);
  • a history of cancer;
  • a history of stroke or blood clot; or
  • if you need surgery or have recently had surgery.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether vitamin E will harm an unborn baby. Do not use this medicine without a doctor’s advice if you are pregnant.

It is not known whether vitamin E passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medicine without a doctor’s advice if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Your dose needs may be different during pregnancy or while you are nursing.

Uses of Vitamin E

Use vitamin E products exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

How should I take vitamin E?

Vitamin E works best if you take it with food.

Measure liquid medicine with the dosing syringe provided, or with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Artificially sweetened liquid medicine may contain phenylalanine. Check the medication label if you have phenylketonuria (PKU).

The recommended dietary allowance of vitamin E increases with age. Follow your healthcare provider’s instructions. You may also consult the Office of Dietary Supplements of the National Institutes of Health or the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Nutrient Database (formerly “Recommended Daily Allowances”) listings for more information.

If you need surgery or a medical procedure, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using vitamin E. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Is it good to apply Vitamin E on the Face?

Apply facial moisturizer, especially if you used a cleanser (optional). Hydrate your skin after the vitamin E oil face treatment by using a moisturizer. … Even if your skin is oily. It is still good to finish up with a moisturizer so your skin doesn’t compensate for dehydrated skin by producing excess oil.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention immediately

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, nausea, diarrhea, dizziness, headache, tiredness, blurred vision, or tiredness.

What should I avoid while taking vitamin E?

Avoid taking other vitamins, mineral supplements, or nutritional products without your doctor’s advice.

If you also take orlistat (alli, Xenical), do not take it within 2 hours before or 2 hours after you take vitamin E.

The side effects of Vitamin E

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to vitamin E: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop taking vitamin E and call your doctor at once if you have:

  • headache, dizziness, vision changes;
  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;
  • unusual weakness or tired feeling;
  • diarrhea, stomach cramps; or
  • easy bruising or bleeding (nosebleeds, bleeding gums).

Common vitamin E side effects may include:

  • nausea;
  • tired feeling;
  • headache; or
  • mild rash.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

Vitamin E dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Vitamin E Deficiency:

  • Treatment: 60 to 75 units orally once daily.
  • Prevention: 30 units orally once daily.

Adult Dose for Tardive Dyskinesia:

  • 600 to 1600 units orally per day.

Usual Adult Dose for Sickle Cell Anemia:

  • 450 units orally per day.

Usual Adult Dose for Alzheimer’s Disease:

  • 1000 units orally twice daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Dietary Supplement:

  • Oral liquid formulation (AQUA-E): 200 units (10 mL) orally once daily.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Vitamin E Deficiency:

  • 1 unit/kg/day orally of water-miscible vitamin E.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Retinopathy Prophylaxis:

Prevention of retinopathy of prematurity or Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) secondary to oxygen therapy: 15 to 30 units/kg/day to maintain plasma levels between 1.5 to 2 mcg/mL (may need as high as 100 units/kg/day). Note: AAP considers this use investigational and routine use is not recommended.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Cystic Fibrosis:

  • 100 to 400 units/day orally.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Dietary Supplement:

  • Dosing: 1 unit vitamin E = 1 mg dl-alpha-tocopherol acetate.
  • Oral:
  • Adequate Intake (AI):
    1 to less than 6 months: 4 units daily
    6 to less than 12 months: 5 units daily
  • Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA):
    1 to 3 years: 6 units daily
    4 to 8 years: 7 units daily
    9 to 13 years: 11 units daily
    13 years and Older: 15 units daily

What other drugs will affect vitamin E?

Tell your doctor about all medicines you use, and those you start or stop using during your treatment, especially:

  • cholestyramine;
  • mineral oil;
  • orlistat (Alli, Xenical); or
  • warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven).

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with vitamin E, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this product only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Hope this was helpful, should there be any Questions, please drop us a comment below.

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